The availability of a website is measured by the percentage of a year in which the website is publicly accessible and reachable via the Internet. This is different from measuring the uptime of a system. Uptime refers to the system itself being online. Uptime does not take into account being able to reach it as in the event of a network outage.[citation needed] A hosting provider's Service Level Agreement (SLA) may include a certain amount of scheduled downtime per year in order to perform maintenance on the systems. This scheduled downtime is often excluded from the SLA timeframe, and needs to be subtracted from the Total Time when availability is calculated. Depending on the wording of an SLA, if the availability of a system drops below that in the signed SLA, a hosting provider often will provide a partial refund for time lost. How downtime is determined changes from provider to provider, therefore reading the SLA is imperative.[11] Not all providers release uptime statistics.[12] Most hosting providers will guarantee at least 99.9% uptime which will allow for 43m of downtime per month, or 8h 45m of downtime per year. 

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If you sign up with Bluehost and want to open an online store, you have a couple of different options at your disposal. If you use WordPress as your CMS you can set up shop pretty easily by installing a plugin like WooCommerce and figuring things out from there. Alternatively, you could sign up to one of Bluehost’s eCommerce packages, which allow you to create an online store for your website in no time. Each package comes with a WooCommerce auto-installer and configuration tool along with a number of other useful features.
The one redeeming quality of WordPress is that it allows you to set up a blog for free. There are plenty of caveats to the free hosting plan but it is a good option for those who can’t or don’t want to spend money on their first website. If you’re serious about building a website, however, I recommend you stay clear of WordPress and go with Bluehost instead.
WordPress hosting is incredibly cost-competitive. The software itself is free, and most shared hosts offer WordPress packages in the $2- to $5-per-month ballpark. It's easy to get started, as hosts will often offer single-click installations for WordPress, and then you can begin browsing the thousands of themes available in the Appearance section of the WordPress dashboard. Customize to your heart's desire, click "Publish," and voila! You've got yourself a self-hosted WordPress website. 
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