Most of the time you’ll want to go with the cheapest possible hosting plan when you’re launching a new website. Unless you’re very experienced in terms of traffic acquisition, chances are you’ll probably have few visitors during the first few months. Once your traffic reaches a certain threshold, you’ll need to upgrade to a better plan and periodically repeat this process as your website continues to grow.

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WordPress doesn’t mention anything about the bandwidth and it seems like all its hosting plans are meant for a single website. Meanwhile, the storage space is pretty limited across the board, with the first three tiers only included 3 GB, 6 GB and 13 GB of storage, respectively. The final two tiers come with 200 GB worth of storage. As far as the other features are concerned, you’ll need to go at least with the $25 per month Business plan if you want to build a half-decent website because that’s when you unlock the ability to install custom plugins, upload themes, remove WordPress.com branding and make use of SEO tools and Google Analytics integration (things that Bluehost gives starting with their Basic $2.95/mo plan)

WordPress has one of the best builders around that allows you to create anything ranging from a simple blog to a highly complex and professional looking website. Unfortunately, WordPress’ hosting plans won’t give you access to the standard CMS that you can customize to your liking right off the bat. Instead, the modified CMS has a number of limitations in place, some of which you can only unlock if you’re willing to pay for one of the more expensive hosting packages.

Bluehost has a lot more to offer in every department and its prices are some of the most affordable on the market when you stop to consider just how much you get in return. Just to put things into perspective, you get more value out of Bluehost’s $2.95 per month Basic shared hosting plan than you get from WordPress’ $8 per month Premium plan. That sort of value pretty much speaks for itself.
The user gets his or her own Web server but is not allowed full control over it (user is denied root access for Linux/administrator access for Windows); however, they are allowed to manage their data via FTP or other remote management tools. The user is disallowed full control so that the provider can guarantee quality of service by not allowing the user to modify the server or potentially create configuration problems. The user typically does not own the server. The server is leased to the client.

First off, Bluehost offers three tiers of shared WordPress hosting – Basic, Plus, and Choice Plus. There’s no Pro plan here but aside from that, the packages are basically the same as the regular shared hosting plans in terms of price and most of the features. The only notable differences are that these plans come with $200 worth of marketing credit and that the Choice Plus package includes an automatic backup system.


Once WordPress is installed and configured, you can begin designing one of two ways: Upload your own HTML files and style sheets and continue customizing in the backend, or choose from a library of thousands of premade website themes. Paired with the abundance of plugins for extensibility, the WordPress interface brings utmost flexibility from a site construction and customization point of view.

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Bluehost, on the other hand, does give you access to the regular WordPress CMS and doesn’t impose any restrictions, so you can use it as you see fit. In addition, the company also offers integration with a different website builder known as Weebly. Weebly is a pretty decent builder but the problem is that you only get the basic version of it for free so you’ll need to fork out a few bucks if you want access to all its features. Personally, I would recommend just sticking with the WordPress CMS instead because it’s free and offers a much higher level of customization.
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