‡ The following suffixes are on offer when registered using the embedded voucher code - .com, .co.uk and .uk. The offer prices are: .co.uk and .uk - FREE when registered for 1 year and .com £1.99 (ex VAT) for the 1st year when registered for any term. These offers entitle you to one .co.uk, one .uk and one .com at the offer price per account. Additionally, the following extensions will be offered at the prices shown (ex VAT) when registered on site for one year: .website - £3.00, .site - £3.00, .tech - £5.00, .store - £5.00, .fun - £3.00, .space - £3.00, .app - £12.00, .london - £14.99, .online - £3.50. Please note, for EU customers VAT rates payable will be subject to your country of residence. Offers are for the first billing period only, do not apply to renewals, cannot be used in conjunction with any other offers and may be withdrawn at any time at the discretion of Namesco Limited. Standard terms & conditions apply.
Unfortunately, neither Bluehost nor WordPress give users the option of paying on a month-by-month basis for their shared hosting subscription. WordPress only works with annual billing cycles while Bluehost accepts annual, biannual and triannual payments. Paying for two or three years in advance grants you certain discounts so it helps to sign up for the long haul if possible.

check domain availablity


If you have any sort of interest in hosting and website building chances are you already know a thing or two about Bluehost and WordPress. These two companies have been in business for many years and their services have been top-notch pretty much from the start. What’s interesting about Bluehost and WordPress is that there’s a bit of a friendly rivalry going on between these companies. On one hand, the two work great alongside each other. But on the other hand, they’re also competing for the same market, to some extent.
One's website is placed on the same server as many other sites, ranging from a few sites to hundreds of websites. Typically, all domains may share a common pool of server resources, such as RAM and the CPU. The features available with this type of service can be quite basic and not flexible in terms of software and updates. Resellers often sell shared web hosting and web companies often have reseller accounts to provide hosting for clients.

what is a domain


Powerful IT resources and security measures come at a price and must always be state of the art to protect customers' technical infrastructure and data effectively. When it comes to 'free' web hosting plans, we recommend proceeding with caution. First, check if there are any hidden costs. Secondly, many providers tend to display advertising on their customer websites. Even if the free basic features attract you, necessary functions or additional system resources often need to be purchased later. This ultimately results in your 'free' option costing you money.
WordPress doesn’t offer an automatic backup system so you’ll need to back up your files using other methods. If you sign up for one of the more expensive hosting plans (starting at $25 per month in WordPress.com’s case) you will unlock the ability to install custom plugins to your site, so you can create backups using one of those. Alternatively, you can copy and save your files locally using an FTP client like Filezilla. Keep in mind, though, that this process can take a very long time depending on the amount of content found on the site.
A seasoned writer, Jason started taking an interest in hosting providers and proxy services six years ago. Since then, he has written hundreds of articles on these topics, continually expanding his knowledge in the process. Whether we’re talking about lists, reviews, or comparisons, you can bet that his articles are always well-researched and have the best interests of users in mind.

domain hosting


Until 1991, the Internet was restricted to use only "...for research and education in the sciences and engineering..."[1][2] and was used for email, telnet, FTP and USENET traffic—but only a tiny number of web pages. The World Wide Web protocols had only just been written[3][4] and not until the end of 1993 would there be a graphical web browser for Mac or Windows computers.[5] Even after there was some opening up of internet access, the situation was confused until 1995.[6]

see if domain available


WordPress is the most popular CMS on the planet and powers nearly 30% of all websites. This widespread use due, in large part, to its usability and zero-dollar cost. But, even though the open-source software is free to use to create a website, you’re going to need a robust hosting solution to power it. Our top-ranked WordPress host, InMotion, offers a number of plans built specifically to run the CMS. And the host’s proprietary site builder, BoldGrid, brings a drag-and-drop functionality to WordPress that simplifies site creation. Bluehost also provides robust hosting support for WordPress. In fact, the host is one of the few providers approved by the WordPress.org Core team. Let’s see how the two hosts fared in this head-to-head battle
When it comes to shared hosting, Bluehost offers four packages to choose from, with prices ranging between $2.95 and $13.95 per month. Bluehost has a very cheap entry point compared to most of the other big hosting providers and even its most expensive package is quite fairly priced. Two of the four packages – Plus and Choice Plus – actually have the same price for the first term so there’s no real reason not to go with Choice Plus right off the bat. Once the first term expires, Choice Plus will become more expensive but you can downgrade to the cheaper version afterward if you wish.
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