WordPress hasn’t been performing too shabby in the speed department either in 2019. The company’s page loadings speeds this year sit at around 954 ms on average. That’s slower than Bluehost (more than 2x slower) but still a very respectable result. That said, we have seen more fluctuations with WordPress-hosted websites so that’s something to keep in mind as well.
Bluehost also offers three managed WordPress plans, with prices ranging between $19.95 and $49.95 per month. The prices of these plans are quite a bit higher but they include a lot of advanced features. A few of the highlights include daily scheduled backups, malware detection and removal, Jetpack Premium, business review tools, PayPal integration, priority customer support, and more. Some of these features are only included with the more expensive packages, however, you get very good value even with the cheapest plan.

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Although I’m going to talk about the WordPress CMS every now and then, I want to emphasize that this is primarily a direct comparison between WordPress.com and Bluehost. WordPress.com is the branch of the company that handles web hosting while WordPress.org is in charge of the CMS. I think that’s an important distinction to make moving forward because we’re primarily interested in what WordPress.com has to offer. 

Having multiple servers hosting the same content for better resource utilization. Clustered servers are a perfect solution for high-availability dedicated hosting, or creating a scalable web hosting solution. A cluster may separate web serving from database hosting capability. (Usually web hosts use clustered hosting for their shared hosting plans, as there are multiple benefits to the mass managing of clients).[9]
Bluehost, on the other hand, does give you access to the regular WordPress CMS and doesn’t impose any restrictions, so you can use it as you see fit. In addition, the company also offers integration with a different website builder known as Weebly. Weebly is a pretty decent builder but the problem is that you only get the basic version of it for free so you’ll need to fork out a few bucks if you want access to all its features. Personally, I would recommend just sticking with the WordPress CMS instead because it’s free and offers a much higher level of customization.
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