Although I’m going to talk about the WordPress CMS every now and then, I want to emphasize that this is primarily a direct comparison between WordPress.com and Bluehost. WordPress.com is the branch of the company that handles web hosting while WordPress.org is in charge of the CMS. I think that’s an important distinction to make moving forward because we’re primarily interested in what WordPress.com has to offer.

bluehost wordpress hosting


Until 1991, the Internet was restricted to use only "...for research and education in the sciences and engineering..."[1][2] and was used for email, telnet, FTP and USENET traffic—but only a tiny number of web pages. The World Wide Web protocols had only just been written[3][4] and not until the end of 1993 would there be a graphical web browser for Mac or Windows computers.[5] Even after there was some opening up of internet access, the situation was confused until 1995.[6]

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Once WordPress is installed and configured, you can begin designing one of two ways: Upload your own HTML files and style sheets and continue customizing in the backend, or choose from a library of thousands of premade website themes. Paired with the abundance of plugins for extensibility, the WordPress interface brings utmost flexibility from a site construction and customization point of view.

vps


The availability of a website is measured by the percentage of a year in which the website is publicly accessible and reachable via the Internet. This is different from measuring the uptime of a system. Uptime refers to the system itself being online. Uptime does not take into account being able to reach it as in the event of a network outage.[citation needed] A hosting provider's Service Level Agreement (SLA) may include a certain amount of scheduled downtime per year in order to perform maintenance on the systems. This scheduled downtime is often excluded from the SLA timeframe, and needs to be subtracted from the Total Time when availability is calculated. Depending on the wording of an SLA, if the availability of a system drops below that in the signed SLA, a hosting provider often will provide a partial refund for time lost. How downtime is determined changes from provider to provider, therefore reading the SLA is imperative.[11] Not all providers release uptime statistics.[12] Most hosting providers will guarantee at least 99.9% uptime which will allow for 43m of downtime per month, or 8h 45m of downtime per year.


Bluehost, on the other hand, does give you access to the regular WordPress CMS and doesn’t impose any restrictions, so you can use it as you see fit. In addition, the company also offers integration with a different website builder known as Weebly. Weebly is a pretty decent builder but the problem is that you only get the basic version of it for free so you’ll need to fork out a few bucks if you want access to all its features. Personally, I would recommend just sticking with the WordPress CMS instead because it’s free and offers a much higher level of customization.
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