Powerful IT resources and security measures come at a price and must always be state of the art to protect customers' technical infrastructure and data effectively. When it comes to 'free' web hosting plans, we recommend proceeding with caution. First, check if there are any hidden costs. Secondly, many providers tend to display advertising on their customer websites. Even if the free basic features attract you, necessary functions or additional system resources often need to be purchased later. This ultimately results in your 'free' option costing you money.
WordPress hosting is incredibly cost-competitive. The software itself is free, and most shared hosts offer WordPress packages in the $2- to $5-per-month ballpark. It's easy to get started, as hosts will often offer single-click installations for WordPress, and then you can begin browsing the thousands of themes available in the Appearance section of the WordPress dashboard. Customize to your heart's desire, click "Publish," and voila! You've got yourself a self-hosted WordPress website.
WordPress provides eCommerce integration but only with its most expensive hosting plan. In return, you get access to everything from site monetization and SEO tools to premium storefront themes and integrations with top shipping carriers. The features you get by signing up for this plan are certainly not bad but paying $45 a month is a bit steep if you ask me. By comparison, Bluehost only charges $12.95 for its most expensive eCommerce package.

seo overview


For those just getting started, perhaps on their first website, we’d like to point out that Bluehost has revamped its user experience — beefing up the user-friendliness factor significantly in recent years. Users will find the dashboard and overall customer experience to be welcoming — about as non-daunting for newcomers as web hosting gets. If you’re looking for WordPress hosting specifically, whether on a shared, virtual, or dedicated server, you’ve come to the right host. Bluehost is one of the few providers endorsed by the WordPress Core team. Install the popular blogging platform in a single click via the control panel, or have the company's managed services team take care of it for you.
If you want to open up an online store, for example, you can’t rely on WordPress right out of the box because the platform doesn’t support eCommerce by default. In that case, you can either add support via plugins or just go with a different CMS like Magento, which is specifically designed for online stores. In other words, it’s always helpful to have full control over which CMS you want to use and, unfortunately, WordPress’ hosting plans won’t provide you with the same level of control as Bluehost.

check domains


If you have any sort of interest in hosting and website building chances are you already know a thing or two about Bluehost and WordPress. These two companies have been in business for many years and their services have been top-notch pretty much from the start. What’s interesting about Bluehost and WordPress is that there’s a bit of a friendly rivalry going on between these companies. On one hand, the two work great alongside each other. But on the other hand, they’re also competing for the same market, to some extent.

Similar to the dedicated web hosting service, but the user owns the colo server; the hosting company provides physical space that the server takes up and takes care of the server. This is the most powerful and expensive type of web hosting service. In most cases, the colocation provider may provide little to no support directly for their client's machine, providing only the electrical, Internet access, and storage facilities for the server. In most cases for colo, the client would have his own administrator visit the data center on site to do any hardware upgrades or changes. Formerly, many colocation providers would accept any system configuration for hosting, even ones housed in desktop-style minitower cases, but most hosts now require rack mount enclosures and standard system configurations.


Anyone... but some extensions have registration rules or restrictions. For example, you can only register a .ltd.uk if you are a limited company and the domain is an exact match to your company name. Most extensions like .com, .co.uk and many more, are open for everyone to register. If you're uncertain about the rules, you can check the information icon next to each extension in our search results.
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